Made by Me!

Wednesday, 19 November 2014

Raspberry Wool Coat - It's Finished And I've Fallen In Love!

Yay it's finished!! Now I am not normally one to blow my own trumpet but I am so super proud of this coat. The plaid and stripes match really well all over and I managed to make something without dramatically fluffing it up along the way!

You can see the various stages of the coat making process on my other blog posts - the toile, choosing the lining, matching plaids and stripes, and pad stitching the collar. The one part of the process I haven't spoken about is the making of the skirt and attaching the top and bottom together. The coats only downside is a distinct lack of pockets and I was going to add some to the side seams as I always get cold hands and even with gloves on I need to be able to shove my hands somewhere warm. Oh and its also useful to keep small items in as well. I feel a bit lost without them. I did sew them in to the coat but then realised that the wrap of the coat meant they gaped open horribly so I unpicked the whole lot and got rid of them. I prefer the good line of the coat skirt rather than warm hands. I will just have to get great gloves!!


With all the unpicking I had managed to stretch that lovely wool a little which was a pain but as I realised when sewing the pieces together I had managed to cut the skirt sections so the plaid was a little off and so had to do some jiggery pokery anyway by moving the seams a little and this covered the stretched bit at the top of the skirt. This process did shorten the coat slightly but I am a short arse anyway and so I didn't really loose anything by doing this.


I attached the lining to the skirt by sewing the right sides together and then turning it out the right way. I understiched the skirt lining as well to stop it rolling out. It was then a case of matching seams and sewing the wool together on the top and bottom. I trimmed down all seams and then made sure all loose threads were dealt with inside the coat and then I slipstitched the lining bottom to top at the waist, using a double thread for strength. To make sure the lining was completely flat I laid it out on the floor to smooth it into place before pinning and sewing.


The final bits of stitching were to slipstitch the lining to the wool at the right hand side where the tie goes through the coat. This means you have a much cleaner finish inside. I then also rolled the hem of the sleeve lining up, slipstitched the fabric and then slipstiched it to the coat itself. There is a lot of lining fabric so it means you have to do a tuck in it to make it fit.

The final touch was to add a chain at the neck so that I could hang the coat up. I salvaged this from one of my old winter coats that was about to go on the scrap heap. 


Overall I am so happy with this coat and would totally recommend it. The fabric I have chosen is extremely warm and I think its quite an elegant coat. I love the vintage feel and the colour pop is going to cheer me on a gloomy London winter day, but mainly I love that I made it! It has been one thing that I have been nervous about attempting but I feel ready now to go forth and make another one with button holes!!

Are you planning on making your coat this winter? If so what kind of coat are you going to make? I am looking forward to seeing other winter coat makes on other peoples sewing blogs as it gets chillier outside!

2 comments:

  1. This looks fabulous! I would like to make this pattern in the shorter length to wear around the house as a kind of "smoking jacket" (not that I'll be smoking in it!). I have a chilly house and I think this would be more glamorous than jumpers.

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    1. Oh I totally agree, what a lovely idea! I love the shorter version and think it would be great as a house jacket. I would love to see it if you make one. I have a chilly house too so maybe I should give it a go!

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